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Thanksgiving – Photography

As an exercise in almsgiving over the next 40 days, this webpage will joyfully give up its praise and thanks for one aspect of life, and not always necessarily a religious one.

The season of Lent asks of us for sacrifice and the foregoing of many things, but an attitude of joy and gratitude should not be amongst them.

As an exercise in almsgiving over the next 40 days, this webpage will joyfully give up its praise and thanks for one aspect of life, and not always necessarily a religious one.

At the outset it should be made clear the viewpoints expressed here are a matter of individual opinion. If any one item doesn’t coincide with your own personal tastes then why not seek to better it with some thanksgiving of your own rather than a critique? You are always welcome to do so at the Archdiocesan website feedback mechanism.

So we invite you to come, walk with us awhile, and be thankful as we journey together to Calvary and beyond to Easter.

There is a realistic debate going on at present as to whether the cameras embedded in our smartphones are signalling the death of photography as an art.

It’s reasonable to say if Kodak had their time all over again it’s a lay down misere they would have spent far more time in developing the hardware which captured those digital ones and zeros than in perfecting the last chemical blends for the shrinking film market. Still, for over 150 years we have had an art form, albeit one which mothballed some talented portrait painters, and let truth to the statement a picture is worth 1000 words.

This Lent, as part of almsgiving, let’s be thankful for the masters of light whose eyes could see something we couldn’t and who had the skills to capture it on a little strip of material embedded with silver halides and nitrate.

Among countless others, here’s to Irving Penn, whose portraiture was unique in itself but wrung additional layers of character out of his famous subjects; to Sebastiao Salgado who blended an ethic of photojournalism and anthropology to his work; to Henri Cartier Bresson whose no frills camera allowed him to snap Paris and the world unawares and also to Australia’s own Olive Cotton who played with light and the shadows it casts in order to gain world renown.

These are but a few of the many, but for all of the beauty they have given us, we say thank you.

Irving Penn

Irving Penn photo 1 Irving Penn photo 2 Irving Penn photo 3

Henri Cartier Bresson

Henri Cartier Bresson photo 1 Henri Cartier Bresson photo 2

Sebastiao Salgado

Sebastiao Salgado photo 1 Sebastiao Salgado photo 2

Olive Cotton

Olive Cotton photo 1 Olive Cotton photo 2

Next thanksgiving article: Believers

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The images used and links made on this webpage are all done so on the understanding they fall under the Australian Copyright Act’s Fair Dealing provisions for the purposes of “Criticism and Review”.

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