Home » Beliefs and works » Blog » Thanksgiving – Stars

Thanksgiving – Stars

As an exercise in almsgiving over the next 40 days, this webpage will joyfully give up its praise and thanks for one aspect of life, and not always necessarily a religious one.

Two men looked out from prison bars,
One saw the mud, the other saw stars… Dale Carnegie

Stars

How conscious we are of the stars probably differs depending on whether you were born in the city or the country. With the city lights competing against and diffusing their power, the stars can be either taken for granted or go largely unremarked upon.

If, however, you happen to spend a clear night in a country town, or even further away on a farm, the light show is absolutely spectacular, to the point that you feel as though you could reach out and reposition the satellites which motor by or else scoop up a handful of the milky way. Such nights are a reminder of how small we are in respect to the whole of creation, but also that we have a sizeable part to play in being witness to its beauty.

Spock

The three wise men weren’t the first to be captivated by the stars, or to recognise the portents of something big being signalled by them. In our modern era, there is a parallel between the stars and Jesus himself, given that the light we perceive from stars here today was emitted hundreds or millions of years ago, depending on its distance from us.

So too, the light and life of Jesus resonates with us still some 2000 years on. It radiates with the same love, warmth and mercy and, once again like the stars, is burning bright through the busyness of the day even if we can’t see it for other distractions. If we care to emulate the great sailors and navigators of history we would do well to determine our course in life using the fixed point of his bright star.

For a final word on the stars, its might pay to defer to a recent visitor from the Vatican Observatory, Br Guy Consolmagno sj, who told The Catholic Leader “the universe, you could argue, had to be rational for it to work… however, the universe didn’t have to be beautiful but it is, and for that we give God praise.” Amen.

Previous thanksgiving article: Pens

The season of Lent asks of us for sacrifice and the foregoing of many things, but an attitude of joy and gratitude should not be amongst them.

As an exercise in almsgiving over the next 40 days, this webpage will joyfully give up its praise and thanks for one aspect of life, and not always necessarily a religious one.

At the outset it should be made clear the viewpoints expressed here are a matter of individual opinion. If any one item doesn’t coincide with your own personal tastes then why not seek to better it with some thanksgiving of your own rather than a critique? You are always welcome to do so at the Archdiocesan website feedback mechanism.

So we invite you to come, walk with us awhile, and be thankful as we journey together to Calvary and beyond to Easter.

COPYRIGHT STATEMENT: All audio, visual and textual content which is included or linked to from this webpage remains the property of the original recording artist, author, producer, director or photographer, as the case may be, and the use of it is not intended to disobey any copyright law.

The images used and links made on this webpage are all done so on the understanding they fall under the Australian Copyright Act’s Fair Dealing provisions for the purposes of “Criticism and Review”.

No commercial activity or financial gain has been generated by the content on this webpage.

Scroll to top